Documentos

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,Part1. Chapters I to V – Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens)

IN this book a number of dialects are used, to wit: the Missouri negrodialect; the extremest form of the backwoods Southwestern dialect; theordinary ”Pike County” dialect; and four modified varieties of this last.The shadings have not been done in a haphazard fashion, or by guesswork;but painstakingly, and with the trustworthy guidance and support ofpersonal familiarity with these several forms of speech.I make this explanation for the reason that without it many readers wouldsuppose that all these characters were trying to talk alike and notsucceeding.

THE AUTHOR.

WILLIAMS, H. Smith. A History of Science Vol. 5

BOOK V
CHAPTER I—THE BRITISH MUSEUM
CHAPTER II—THE ROYAL SOCIETY OP LONDON FOR IMPROVING NATURAL KNOWLEDGE
CHAPTER III—THE ROYAL INSTITUTION AND LOW-TEMPERATURE RESEARCHES
CHAPTER IV—SOME PHYSICAL LABORATORIES AND PHYSICAL PROBLEMS
CHAPTER V—THE MARINE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY
CHAPTER VI—ERNST HAECKEL AND THE NEW ZOOLOGY
CHAPTER VII—SOME MEDICAL LABORATORIES AND MEDICAL PROBLEMS
CHAPTER VIII—SOME UNSOLVED SCIENTIFIC PROBLEMS
CHAPTER IX—RETROSPECT AND PROSPECT
APPENDIX

WILLIAMS, H. Smith. A History of Science Vol. 3

CONTENTS

BOOK III
CHAPTER I. THE SUCCESSORS OF NEWTON IN ASTRONOMY
CHAPTER II. THE PROGRESS OF MODERN ASTRONOMY
CHAPTER III. THE NEW SCIENCE OF PALEONTOLOGY
CHAPTER IV. THE ORIGIN AND DEVELOPMENT OF MODERN GEOLOGY
CHAPTER V. THE NEW SCIENCE OF METEOROLOGY
CHAPTER VI. MODERN THEORIES OF HEAT AND LIGHT
CHAPTER VII. THE MODERN DEVELOPMENT OF ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM
CHAPTER VIII. THE CONSERVATION OF ENERGY
CHAPTER IX. THE ETHER AND PONDERABLE MATTER
APPENDIX

WILLIAMS, H. Smith. A History of Science Vol. 2

CONTENTS

BOOK II
CHAPTER I. SCIENCE IN THE DARK AGE
CHAPTER II. MEDIAEVAL SCIENCE AMONG THE ARABIANS
CHAPTER III. MEDIAEVAL SCIENCE IN THE WEST
CHAPTER IV. THE NEW COSMOLOGY–COPERNICUS TO KEPLER AND GALILEO
CHAPTER V. GALILEO AND THE NEW PHYSICS
CHAPTER VI. TWO PSEUDO-SCIENCES–ALCHEMY AND ASTROLOGY
CHAPTER VII. FROM PARACELSUS TO HARVEY
CHAPTER VIII. MEDICINE IN THE SIXTEENTH AND SEVENTEENTH CENTURIES
CHAPTER IX. PHILOSOPHER-SCIENTISTS AND NEW INSTITUTIONS OFLEARNING
CHAPTER X. THE SUCCESSORS OF GALILEO IN PHYSICAL SCIENCE
CHAPTER XI. NEWTON AND THE COMPOSITION OF LIGHT
CHAPTER XII. NEWTON AND THE LAW OF GRAVITATION
CHAPTER XIII. INSTRUMENTS OF PRECISION IN THE AGE OF NEWTON
CHAPTER XIV. PROGRESS IN ELECTRICITY FROM GILBERT AND VONGUERICKE TO FRANKLIN
CHAPTER XV. NATURAL HISTORY TO THE TIME OF LINNAEUS
APPENDIX

WILLIAMS, H. Smith. A History of Science Vol. 1

BOOK I.
CONTENTS
CHAPTER I. PREHISTORIC SCIENCE
CHAPTER II. EGYPTIAN SCIENCE
CHAPTER III. SCIENCE OF BABYLONIA AND ASSYRIA
CHAPTER IV. THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ALPHABET
CHAPTER V. THE BEGINNINGS OF GREEK SCIENCE
CHAPTER VI. THE EARLY GREEK PHILOSOPHERS IN ITALY
CHAPTER VII. GREEK SCIENCE IN THE EARLY ATTIC PERIOD
CHAPTER VIII. POST-SOCRATIC SCIENCE AT ATHENS
CHAPTER IX. GREEK SCIENCE OF THE ALEXANDRIAN OR HELLENISTIC PERIOD
CHAPTER X. SCIENCE OF THE ROMAN PERIOD
CHAPTER XI. A RETROSPECTIVE GLANCE AT CLASSICAL SCIENCE
APPENDIX

VIVIAN, E. Charles. A History of Aeronautics

FOREWORD

Although successful heavier-than-air flight is less than twodecades old, and successful dirigible propulsion antedates it bya very short period, the mass of experiment and accomplishmentrenders any one-volume history of the subject a matter ofselection.

MACDONALD, George. A Dish of Orts

PREFACE.

Since printing throughout the title _Orts_, a doubt has arisen in mymind as to its fitting the nature of the volume. It could hardly,however, be imagined that I associate the idea of _worthlessness_ withthe work contained in it. No one would insult his readers by offeringthem what he counted valueless scraps, and telling them they were such.These papers, those two even which were caught in the net of theready-writer from extempore utterance, whatever their merits inthemselves; are the results of by no means trifling labour. So much aman _ought_ to be able to say for his work. And hence I might defend, ifnot quite justify my title–for they are but fragmentary presentments oflarger meditation. My friends at least will accept them as such, whetherthey like their collective title or not.

BALZAC, Honoré de. A Daughter of Eve

CHAPTER I

THE TWO MARIES

In one of the finest houses of the rue Neuve-des-Mathurins, athalf-past eleven at night, two young women were sitting before thefireplace of a boudoir hung with blue velvet of that tender shade,with shimmering reflections, which French industry has lately learnedto fabricate. Over the doors and windows were draped soft folds ofblue cashmere, the tint of the hangings, the work of one of thoseupholsterers who have just missed being artists. A silver lamp studdedwith turquoise, and suspended by chains of beautiful workmanship, hungfrom the centre of the ceiling

HUDSON, W. H. A Crystal Age

shuts us inlike our own skins; no one can boast that he has broken out of thatprison. The vast, unbounded prospect lies before us, but, as the poetmournfully adds, “clouds and darkness rest upon it.” Nevertheless wecannot suppress all curiosity, or help asking one another, What is yourdream–your ideal? What is your News from Nowhere, or, rather, what isthe result of the little shake your hand has given to the old pasteboardtoy with a dozen bits of colored glass for contents? And, most importantof all, can you present it in a narrative or romance which will enableme to pass an idle hour not disagreeably? How, for instance, does itcompare in this respect with other prophetic books on the shelf?