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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,Part7. Chapters XXXI to XXXV – Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens)

HUCKLEBERRY FINN

By Mark Twain

Part 7.
CHAPTER XXXI.

WE dasn’t stop again at any town for days and days; kept right along down the river. We was down south in the warm weather now, and a mighty longways from home. We begun to come to trees with Spanish moss on them,hanging down from the limbs like long, gray beards. It was the first I ever see it growing, and it made the woods look solemn and dismal.

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,Part6. Chapters XXVI to XXX – Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens)

HUCKLEBERRY FINN

By Mark Twain

Part 6.
CHAPTER XXVI.

WELL, when they was all gone the king he asks Mary Jane how they was offfor spare rooms, and she said she had one spare room, which would do forUncle William, and she’d give her own room to Uncle Harvey, which was alittle bigger, and she would turn into the room with her sisters andsleep on a cot; and up garret was a little cubby, with a pallet in it.The king said the cubby would do for his valley–meaning me.

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,Part5. Chapters XXI to XXV – Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens)

HUCKLEBERRY FINN

By Mark Twain

Part 5.
CHAPTER XXI.

IT was after sun-up now, but we went right on and didn’t tie up. Theking and the duke turned out by and by looking pretty rusty; but afterthey’d jumped overboard and took a swim it chippered them up a good deal.After breakfast the king he took a seat on the corner of the raft, andpulled off his boots and rolled up his britches, and let his legs danglein the water, so as to be comfortable, and lit his pipe, and went togetting his Romeo and Juliet by heart.

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,Part4. Chapters XVI to XX – Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens)

HUCKLEBERRY FINN

By Mark Twain

Part 4.
CHAPTER XVI.

WE slept most all day, and started out at night, a little ways behind amonstrous long raft that was as long going by as a procession. She hadfour long sweeps at each end, so we judged she carried as many as thirtymen, likely. She had five big wigwams aboard, wide apart, and an opencamp fire in the middle, and a tall flag-pole at each end. There was apower of style about her.

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,Part1. Chapters I to V – Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens)

IN this book a number of dialects are used, to wit: the Missouri negrodialect; the extremest form of the backwoods Southwestern dialect; theordinary ”Pike County” dialect; and four modified varieties of this last.The shadings have not been done in a haphazard fashion, or by guesswork;but painstakingly, and with the trustworthy guidance and support ofpersonal familiarity with these several forms of speech.I make this explanation for the reason that without it many readers wouldsuppose that all these characters were trying to talk alike and notsucceeding.

THE AUTHOR.

WILLIAMS, H. Smith. A History of Science Vol. 5

BOOK V
CHAPTER I—THE BRITISH MUSEUM
CHAPTER II—THE ROYAL SOCIETY OP LONDON FOR IMPROVING NATURAL KNOWLEDGE
CHAPTER III—THE ROYAL INSTITUTION AND LOW-TEMPERATURE RESEARCHES
CHAPTER IV—SOME PHYSICAL LABORATORIES AND PHYSICAL PROBLEMS
CHAPTER V—THE MARINE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY
CHAPTER VI—ERNST HAECKEL AND THE NEW ZOOLOGY
CHAPTER VII—SOME MEDICAL LABORATORIES AND MEDICAL PROBLEMS
CHAPTER VIII—SOME UNSOLVED SCIENTIFIC PROBLEMS
CHAPTER IX—RETROSPECT AND PROSPECT
APPENDIX

WILLIAMS, H. Smith. A History of Science Vol. 3

CONTENTS

BOOK III
CHAPTER I. THE SUCCESSORS OF NEWTON IN ASTRONOMY
CHAPTER II. THE PROGRESS OF MODERN ASTRONOMY
CHAPTER III. THE NEW SCIENCE OF PALEONTOLOGY
CHAPTER IV. THE ORIGIN AND DEVELOPMENT OF MODERN GEOLOGY
CHAPTER V. THE NEW SCIENCE OF METEOROLOGY
CHAPTER VI. MODERN THEORIES OF HEAT AND LIGHT
CHAPTER VII. THE MODERN DEVELOPMENT OF ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM
CHAPTER VIII. THE CONSERVATION OF ENERGY
CHAPTER IX. THE ETHER AND PONDERABLE MATTER
APPENDIX

WILLIAMS, H. Smith. A History of Science Vol. 2

CONTENTS

BOOK II
CHAPTER I. SCIENCE IN THE DARK AGE
CHAPTER II. MEDIAEVAL SCIENCE AMONG THE ARABIANS
CHAPTER III. MEDIAEVAL SCIENCE IN THE WEST
CHAPTER IV. THE NEW COSMOLOGY–COPERNICUS TO KEPLER AND GALILEO
CHAPTER V. GALILEO AND THE NEW PHYSICS
CHAPTER VI. TWO PSEUDO-SCIENCES–ALCHEMY AND ASTROLOGY
CHAPTER VII. FROM PARACELSUS TO HARVEY
CHAPTER VIII. MEDICINE IN THE SIXTEENTH AND SEVENTEENTH CENTURIES
CHAPTER IX. PHILOSOPHER-SCIENTISTS AND NEW INSTITUTIONS OFLEARNING
CHAPTER X. THE SUCCESSORS OF GALILEO IN PHYSICAL SCIENCE
CHAPTER XI. NEWTON AND THE COMPOSITION OF LIGHT
CHAPTER XII. NEWTON AND THE LAW OF GRAVITATION
CHAPTER XIII. INSTRUMENTS OF PRECISION IN THE AGE OF NEWTON
CHAPTER XIV. PROGRESS IN ELECTRICITY FROM GILBERT AND VONGUERICKE TO FRANKLIN
CHAPTER XV. NATURAL HISTORY TO THE TIME OF LINNAEUS
APPENDIX